• Annie Webb

My interior design journey


Or how I got here, dear reader .


When I was training for my Diploma I hated sticking bits and pieces onto a board or using random digital images (my own examples below) as a way of presenting a Design concept. I want to see the whole space not just a cross section! Is collating random images the best way to represent your interior design?


Example of my digital boards



My lightbulb moment

Early on in my interior design career I started to explore digital interior design to produce not just one concept of a design but the whole design in an accurate room setting. In other words an exact representation in your actual space.



I recognised I really had something, during a meeting with one of my first clients. Sue and husband Chris had debated for years about remodelling their narrow galley kitchen adjacent to a square dining room. Knocking thru would create a tricky T-shape, hard to visualise and they became really stuck.


Sue's original galley kitchen


Sue was keen to have a sharp dark navy and crisp white scheme. They didn't have enough room for an island, but they could have a substantial peninsula with a breakfast bar. During the meeting I showed them my new kitchen layouts (below) with the knock thru and new kitchen designed in the space. Sue looked at the images and said, "I'm feeling excited about it for the first time in years, you've visualised how it could look and I can see now it could work".


My digital designs of Sue's kitchen


Final actual design on completion


Above is the new actual kitchen, now completed. I haven't looked back since that first lightbulb moment with Sue!


What you see is what you get?

Well no, not really, a mood board cannot represent what the whole room will look like. Similarly Estate agents practice well known tricks to show new housing projects. Don't we deserve an honest interpretation of what we are getting?


These are brochure pictures of two new build home living rooms, I recently designed for clients. Taken with wide angle lenses they are allowed a "10% margin of error" on listing a home. So you have to take that into account. If you manage to find a floor plan with dimensions, they frequently mislead on size, as I discover when copying and drawing floor plans. New build living rooms are are now commonly approx 5m x 3m , but I think you'll agree they look bigger on the images. The one on the left actually had no room for a dining table, but the wide angle lens gives a different impression.


Mood board or digital of actual room, you decide!

A cross section random section or an accurate representation of the whole space! I strive to give clients my honest and genuine opinion, together with an authentic representation of their actual room with appropriate furniture, decor, lighting and accessories. If the chosen style doesn't work for their architecture or space, I let them know and we try again. At the end of the day clients are paying for a sincere and bone fide service which everyone deserves to receive, don't they?



Like some remote help with your interior project?


Let's get together over a zoom to chat about your interior project. No guesswork or imagination needed! I can provide you with style direction and clear project strategy to help you move forward. Contact me for a chat!

www.anniewebbinteriors.com/get-in-touch